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Progress with Progresso

Today I met with Abias Cavuvi, band leader of the soon-to-be Conservation Musicians Progresso. We set out a plan, and agreed to meet tomorrow to begin to compose a new tune about protecting and respecting the numerous rivers that radiate out from the Angolan highlands. Especially those heading south towards the Okavango Delta!

Here’s a clip I scrapped together from some odds and ends of footage that I captured while I sat in on a band practice about a week ago. The style is Kwasa Kwasa, a particular rhythm and dance which has spread out from the DRC since becoming popular there in the 1970s. The first time I heard it was down in Seronga, on the edge of the Delta, composing the first CMP conservation song ever, Ke Rata Okavango with Gongwe Wamana. As soon as I heard this Progresso tune, I recognized the style!

Like I said, it’s scrapped together, but I hope you enjoy it! ~Alex

Sneak Peak: Angolan Conservation Musicians “Progresso”Today I met with Abias Cavuvi, band leader of the soon-to-be Conservation Musicians “Progresso.” We set out a plan, and agreed to meet tomorrow to begin to compose a new tune about protecting and respecting the numerous rivers that radiate out from the Angolan highlands. Especially those heading south towards the Okavango Delta!Here’s a clip I scrapped together from some odds and ends of footage that I captured while I sat in on a band practice about a week ago. The style is Kwasa Kwasa, a particular rhythm and dance which has spread out from the DRC since becoming popular there in the 1970s. The first time I heard it was down in Seronga, on the edge of the Delta, composing the first CMP conservation song ever, “Ke Rata Okavango” with Gongwe Wamana. As soon as I heard this Progresso tune, I recognized the style!Like I said, it’s scrapped together, but I hope you enjoy it! ~AlexAlso found here: http://www.ntrepidmedia.net/progress-with-progreso/

Posted by The Conservation Music Project on Sunday, April 10, 2016

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